MAPS of Africa Natural Borders and Nations 1872 - 1885

Africa Map 1872

A map of Africa showing the continent prior to the Berlin Conference of 1885, when the most powerful countries in Europe at the time convened to make their territorial claims on Africa and establish their colonial borders at the start of the New Imperialism period. The map shows the European possessions of Cape Colony, Orange Free State, South Africa, and the Congo Free State controlled by Leopold II of Belgium. The Congo Free State was established as a corporate state, similar to the British East India Company, for the purpose of developing a trade monopoly in Africa. This map shows the borders of Congo Free State and the boundary limit of free trade to the north and south by dashed red lines. This free trade zone essentially cut a swath for Belgium across central Africa from the Atlantic to the Indian Ocean. Of significant interest, this map shows the native African States and indicates the major tribes of the continent. The African States include Marutse-Manbunda Land, Damara Land, Great Namaqua, and Zulu Land in the south, Masai Land, Zanzibar, and Somauli Land in the east, Darfoor, Kordofan, Abyssinia, Nubia, and Egypt in the northeast, Tripoli, Fezzan, Tibesti, Tunis, Algeria, and Morocco along the Mediterranean and Barbary, and Adrar, Sene-Gambia, Karta, Bambara, Massina, Tombo, Mossi, Ashantee, Dahomey, Gando, Yoruba, Benin, Saukatoo, Bornoo, Adamawa, Baghirmi, and Waday in the west. This map also shows the transportation significance of the continent with railroad times scaled at 30 miles per hour and steamship times between major world ports scaled at 15 miles per hour.

Caravan trade routes are also shown. Current flow directions are indicated, and major currents are named, including the Mozambique, Agulhas, South Atlantic, and Guinea currents. Time zones are indicated at the top of the map at 20 degree intervals from 12 noon, London. A cross-section of the continent is shown at the bottom of the map, running approximately along the 15th parallel from Cape Verde on the Atlantic to the Strait of Bab-el-Mandeb on the Gulf of Aden, and includes comparative vertical profiles of Africa's major mountains. Comparative latitudes and temperatures for western hemisphere continents are shown on the left-hand edge of the map, with the eastern hemisphere on the right-hand edge. Longitude from Greenwich is shown at the top of the map, with longitude from Washington at the bottom. The inset map of principle products and principle seaports of the continent also indicate general elevations with highlands in buff color, and lowlands in green. An outline map of Kansas is included at the same map scale to show the comparative area size relationship.
 


Africa Map 1876

A map of Africa in 1876 showing native African States and European possessions of Britain, France, Spain and Portugal prior to the Berlin Conference of 1885. On this map, European possessions include Algeria, Cape Colony, Griquala Land West, Orange River Republic, Caffir Land, Transvaal, and the coastal areas of Zulu Land, Sofala, Mozambique, Sierra Leon, Ashantee, Congo, Angola, Benguela, and Mossamedes. The African States include Morocco, Tunis, Tripoli, Fezzan, Egypt, Nubia, Air, Masina, Bambarra, Gandoa, Liberia, Ashantee, Dahomey, Sokoto, Bornu, Kanem, Bagirmi, Waday, Adamaua, Dahfur, Kordofan, Abyssinia, Shoa, Adian, and Zanguebar.

The names of African Tribes are shown in italics, and include the Tuaregs, Tebus, Jolafs, Mandingos, Fellats, Niam-Niam, Gallas, Somalis, Balanda, Makololo, Matebele, Ovampos, Damaras, Namaquas, Bechuanas, and Bushmen. Major cities, rivers, lakes, and mountain systems are shown, as well as islands under European control. Inset maps detail the Mascarene Islands, Egypt, and Cape Verde Islands. An outline map of Pennsylvania is included at the same map scale to show the comparative area size relationship. Place Names: A Complete Map of Africa, Egypt, Tripoli, Algeria, Morocco, Darfur, Waday, Kanem, Bagirmi, Bornu, Sokoto, Masina, Bambarra, Gando, Guinea, Cape Colony, Madagascar.

Africa Map 1879

Map of pre-colonial Africa, showing the predominately native countries and territories of the African continent in 1879. The counties include the Barbary States of Morocco, Algeria, Tunis, Tripoli and Fezzan, the Egyptian territories of Egypt Proper, Nubia, and Egyptian Sudan, the Somali, Abyssinia, Zanguebar, Mozambique, Sofala, and Madagascar, the Upper Guinea countries of Senegambia, Sierra Leon, Liberia, and Ashantee-Dahomey, and the Lower Guinea countries of the Loango, Congo, Angola, and Benguela. The map also shows the European possessions of the Cape Colony, Transvaal Republic, Orange River Republic, and Natal.

The map shows various regions of the continent as fertile belts and desert belts, and indicates major trade goods produced in the regions such as palm oil, ivory, skins, and cattle. Major cities are shown, with important trade centers highlighted with a red cross mark. Major Ocean currents are shown, including the Equatorial Current, South Atlantic Current, Agulhas Current, and the Mozambique Current. Two inset maps detail the Nile Delta and Suez Canal, and the Mascarene Islands. This map is apparently intended for US students in that longitude is shown from the Greenwich prime meridian at the top of the map, and from the Washington prime meridian at the bottom of the map. Also, an outline map of Ohio is included at the same map scale to show the comparative area size relationship.

Africa Map 1882

A map of Africa as it was known in 1882 before the Berlin Conference of 1885, when the most powerful countries in Europe at the time convened to make their territorial claims on Africa and establish their colonial borders at the start of the New Imperialism period. In 1882 the two realms of greatest European influence were around the Cape Colony at the southern tip of the continent, and the Congo Free State controlled by Leopold II of Belgium. The Congo Free State, or Congo State, was established as a corporate state, similar to the British East India Company, for the purpose of developing a trade monopoly in Africa. This map shows the borders of Congo State by solid red lines, and the limit of free trade to the north and south by dashed red lines.

This free trade zone essentially cut a swath for Belgium across central Africa from the Atlantic to the Indian Ocean. This map illustrates the contrast between the practice of native peoples in establishing natural territorial borders along rivers, mountain ranges, trade routes, or spheres of influence, and the typically European establishment of abstract cadastral or surveyed boundaries at the Berlin Conference. The map shows the native territories of the Zulu, Namaqua, Makalolo, Matebele, Sofala, Damara, Angola, Benguela, Mossa, Medes, Zanguebar, Congo, Sokoto, Darfoor, Schekka, Somali, Kordofan, Wadai, Bornu, Gando, Dahomey, Ashantee, and Tuat. Capitals and major cities are underlined, and this map is color-coded to show the low plains in green and the high lands in buff.

Africa Map 1883

A map of Africa showing the continent prior to the Berlin Conference of 1885, when the most powerful countries in Europe at the time convened to make their territorial claims on Africa and establish their colonial borders at the start of the New Imperialism period. While the majority of the continent is shown with vague territorial outlines for the native states, the areas of European interest along the Barbary Coast and Egypt, and the southern tip of the continent are detailed with inset maps. Major cities, ports, trade centers, and railroads are shown.

Place Names: A Complete Map of Africa, Algeria, Egypt, Madagascar, Marocco, Tripoli, Negambia, Cape colony, Mozambique, Zanguebar, Abyssinia, Nubia, Fezzan.

 


Africa Map 1884

Map of Africa showing the continent before the Berlin Conference of 1885, when the most powerful countries in Europe at the time convened to make their territorial claims on Africa and establish their colonial borders at the start of the New Imperialism period. The map shows several of the initial European footholds in Africa, such as the Cape Colony, the Colony of Natal, and Orange River Republic in the south, but of perhaps greater significance, this map shows the territorial lands of native groups at the time.

These include the lands of the Bechuanas, Zoolus, and Hottentots in the south, the Guinea, Loango, Cimbebas and Damaras along the west coast, the Mozambique, Zanguebar and Somaulies of the east coast, the Egyptian, Barca, Fezzan, and others along the Mediterranean Barbary, and the Senegambia, Bambarra, Houssa, and Bornou of western Africa. The illustrates the contrast between the practice of native peoples establishing natural territorial borders along rivers, mountain ranges, trade routes, or spheres of influence, and the typically European establishment of abstract cadastral or surveyed boundaries. The map also shows the locations and dates of important findings by European explorers such as Livingston, Speke, Burton, and Baker.


Africa Map 1885

Map of African continent prior to the Berlin Conference of 1885, when the most powerful countries in Europe at the time convened to make their territorial claims on Africa and establish their colonial borders at the start of the New Imperialism period. This map shows the native African States of Morocco, Algeria, Tunis, Tripoli, and Fezzan in the Barbary region, Egypt, Nubia, Darfur, Kordofan, Abyssinia, and Somauli Land in the northeast, Sokoto, Bornu, Bagjimi, Waday, Lower Guinea, and Zanguebar in central Africa, Aderer, Senegambia, Liberia, Bambarra, Masina, Ashantee, Gold Coast, Dahomey, and Houssa in western Africa, and Benguela, Matabeli, Mozambique, Sofala, Zulu Land and Kaffraria in the south. The European possessions of Cape Colony, Orange River Free State, and Transvaal are shown. Several of the larger native group names are shown on the map, as well as major cities and trade centers, rivers, deserts, and mountain systems.

 

 
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Africa Federation , Federación Áfricana , Afrika Federation , 아프리카 연맹 , Afrika Föderation , Afrikka liitto , アフリカ連合 , Afrika Federatie , Африка Федерации , Fédération Afrique , África Federação

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Africa Federation , Federación Áfricana , Afrika Federation , 아프리카 연맹 , Afrika Föderation , Afrikka liitto , アフリカ連合 , Afrika Federatie , Африка Федерации , Fédération Afrique , África Federação

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n , Afrikka liitto , アフリカ連合 , Afrika Federatie , Африка Федерации , Fédération Afrique , África Federação

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